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THE MONOPOLIZATION OF INJURED WORKERS’ HEALTHCARE

Posted on 12 July 2012 by admin

Dignity Health Buyout of U.S. Healthworks

 

August’s planned buyout of U.S. Healthworks by Dignity Health is a red flag to injured workers who more than likely may be sent to a medical center owned by this behemoth by year’s end. As of now, U.S. Healthworks operates 172 medical centers nationally, and Dignity Health has 33 medical facilities throughout the state of California, four in Nevada and three in Arizona.

According to U.S. Healthworks CEO, Daniel Crowley, the buyout will provide a “great platform for us to continue growing our network to provide high-quality health care services throughout the country,” which he recently stated in a Modesto Bee article.

This medical conglomerate includes ambulatory surgery through its acquisition of United Surgical Partners International and imaging centers via its acquisition of SimonMedImaging. Dignity Health wants to expand its operations from coast to coast and increase their profits by an even more sizeable margin. It is a well-known fact that Daniel Crowley helped

What this means for injured workers is that any time there suffer a work-related injury and they are sent to one of Dignity Health/U.S. Healthworks facilities, be it urgent care, MRIs, or any other medical necessity, they will more than likely not be offered adequate medical assistance. U.S. Healthworks has a track record of focusing only on increasing their medical profits and not on offering the best medical care to injured workers. The level of occupational medicine will plummet and the ones who will suffer will be those who will be forced to find medical treatment at these facilities that do not have their best interests in mind.

The monopolization of occupational care is a manner in which to raise prices and offer less medical services for the amount. This in turn will hinder adequate medical treatment to injured workers and essentially prolong their rehabilitation process and an opportunity to work or have medical care for chronic conditions caused by occupational injuries.

Now is the time to act and stop this monopoly by contacting your state representatives. If we stand idly by – occupational health centers and providers that truly help injured workers will become a memory of the past and injured workers will be burdened by inadequate medical care, medications and rehabilitation.

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